Why Does My Dog Only Hump Me?

Are you tired of constantly being the target of your dog’s humping habits? Do you feel like you’re the only one your dog wants to hump, no matter how many stuffed animals you provide as an alternative?

Your buddy may be humping you as a sign of affection or as a way of seeking attention. Dogs may also hump as a way of asserting their dominance over their owners. In some cases, humping may be a sign of underlying anxiety or other behavioral issues.

In this blog post, we’ll explore the reasons why dogs engage in this behavior and what you can do to prevent it.

It’s Playtime! Let’s Have Fun with Our Pups

Have you ever noticed how excited your dog gets when you come home, or when you grab a toy to play with them? Well, your furry friend may see humping as a form of play!

Puppies and young dogs are full of energy and enthusiasm, and they often don’t know how to channel it in a “polite” way.

Now, I know what you’re thinking: “But why me? Why not the mailman, or the neighbor’s cat, or the plush toy on the couch?” Well, the truth is, your champion sees you as their pack leader and their favorite playmate.

But be warned: if you’re not in the mood to play, the dog’s humping might not be as cute as it seems. You might have to give them a firm “no” to get them to stop!

Humping and Other Dogs’ Scents”

One of the reasons that a canine might hump only you and not other people is that they are picking up on the scent of other dogs on your clothing.

This can cause them to become aroused and start humping, especially if they are feeling territorial or protective of their owner.

I would like to mention here another interesting problem – the inability to reach a female dog who is in heat!

In this situation, the beloved pooch may become sexually frustrated and express this frustration by humping you or other nearby objects.

While this behavior may be amusing, it’s important to remember that it’s a sign of your dog’s sexual frustration and should be addressed in a kind and gentle manner.

A Learned Behavior?

Your dog may have learned to hump as a way to get attention or treats from you. This is known as positive reinforcement, and it means that the buddy has associated humping with receiving something it wants (like a belly rub or a treat).

You’re the only one who gives them the attention or rewards they’re looking for! It may not be intentional on their part – they’re just following their instincts and doing what works for them.

I would try to redirect my dog’s attention to more appropriate activities – by teaching it a new trick or rewarding it for sitting or lying down instead. In other words, bad habits go into the past.

Poor Socialization or Lack of Discipline?

This means that furry friends may not have had enough positive interactions with other dogs and people during their critical socialization period, which is typically between 5 and 12 weeks of age.

As a result, they may not know how to behave appropriately around others and may exhibit abnormal or inappropriate behaviors (like humping).

But it’s never too late to walk around town and explore new environments!

Medical Issue

Keep in mind that I am not a vet but based on my research these are the problems: hormonal imbalance or urinary tract infection.

These types of medical problems can cause dogs to exhibit unusual behaviors, such as excessive humping.

Buddy may be just trying to tell us that something’s not quite right down there. Don’t worry, though – a trip to the vet can help us figure out what’s going on …

My Experience with Sarplaninac Dogs

Honestly, I don’t have this problem with my dogs because I establish clear rules of the game.

However, the situation is different with puppies and they are allowed to explore and play in ways that may not be acceptable for adult dogs.

This may include humping, which is a common behavior in puppies as they learn about social interactions and boundaries.

On the other hand, they are the cutest and most playful then.

4 Tips to Stop Dog Humping

  • Provide exercises and mental stimulation: Dogs that are bored or have pent-up energy are more likely to engage in unwanted behaviors. Make sure your furry friend gets plenty of exercises and mental stimulation to help prevent them from engaging in this behavior.
  • Correct the behavior with a stern “no” or “stop”: If the dog continues to engage in humping behavior, try to interrupt it with a stern “no” and remove them from the situation. This can help them associate the behavior with negative consequences.
  • Neuter or spay your dog: One of the most effective ways to prevent humping behavior in dogs is to have them neutered or spayed (reduce hormones). My advice is to use this as the last option.
  • Don’t punish the canine for humping: Punishing them for it can cause them to become anxious or fearful! Instead, focus on redirecting their behavior to a more appropriate activity.

Yes, dogs may hump to relieve stress. This behavior is a natural way for dogs to release pent-up energy and alleviate anxiety.

To calm a dog that has a habit of humping, you can discourage the behavior by pushing them off, turning away, or changing your position to prevent them from mounting you.

Conclusion

Humping is a natural behavior for dogs, and it’s not necessarily a sign of aggression or sexual behavior. In fact, dogs of all ages and genders may engage in humping, and it can be a sign of many different things.

It is important to monitor your dog’s behavior and consult with a veterinarian or professional trainer if the humping becomes excessive or problematic.

Just remember to be patient and understanding, and your furry friend will eventually grow out of it.

admin
admin

My name is Alen Stefanovic, and I am the founder and administrator of the website "Awesome Sarplaninac". As an economist-trade manager, and web designer, I have a passion for the Sarplaninac breed (number 1 dogs for me). My father has been breeding these dogs since 1990, and through the website, I aim to share valuable information about nutrition, care, and training for both puppies and adult dogs. Whether you're a new or experienced owner, you'll find plenty of helpful tips and resources on the site. Welcome to "Sarplaninac FCI 4302", and I wish you a pleasant stay.